Friday, June 26, 2015

EPA Knew EMFs Were a “Probable Human Carcinogen” Decades Ago and Covered It Up

Did you know that back in 1990, the Environmental Protection Agency was all set to release a report that admitted electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are dangerous to our health, including that EMFs have been linked with “the development of various cancers” but stopped short of straight up admitting they are “probable carcinogens”? 

 

Isn’t it ironic the newspaper thought to tack a Radio Shack add onto the end of this article?

The clipping, published in the October 4, 1990 edition of The Indiana Gazette, reported:

    Now the Environmental Protection Agency is on the verge of publishing a report suggesting that EMF is linked with the development of various cancers. And at one point, someone within the agency had considered an even more drastic step — classifying low-frequency electromagnetic fields as probable cancer-causing agents in the same rank as dioxin or PCBs.

Wow. They were all set to classify low frequency EMFs in the same rank as dioxin, a highly dangerous chemical thought by some even today to be among the most toxic substances out there.

Continuing:

    But the EPA has stopped short of the probable carcinogen conclusion, which could have drastic implications for regulation of the American utility industry and in the workplace. Louis Slesin, power-industry watchdog and the editor of Microwave News, published in his journal’s most recent issue a paragraph from a rough draft of the EPA study recommending that low-frequency electromagnetic fields be classified as probable human carcinogens.

    The paragraph, Slesin said in a recent interview with The Morning Call, has since been deleted from the report, which won’t be issued in official, final form until this month, according to the July 20 issue of TIME magazine.
 

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