Monday, October 13, 2014

Why Most Fitness Programs Are A Scam


Mark Rippetoe says specialized instructors all have different ideas of the most important part of fitness.

Face it, most of us aren't complete athletes. We lack the strength to make us fit, and we follow cultlike exercise programs. But there is a cure: Listen to renegade coach Mark Rippetoe, grab a barbell, and get back to basics.

Mark Rippetoe believes the $27 billion fitness industry is confusing you. Worst of all, they’re doing it on purpose to nab your cash.

The man doesn’t have a degree in exercise physiology or a PhD after his name. Instead, the owner of Wichita Falls Athletic Club in Texas has more than 35 years of experience training weight lifters and their coaches. In 2009, he cut ties with CrossFit after developing the company’s barbell program and became the first coach to give up his National Strength and Conditioning Association credential—which is why you’ve likely heard his name.

The reason he left is surprisingly simple and immediately appealing: Strength is the core of fitness. Without it, you won’t be a fast roadie, confident MTBer, or strong skier. The problem with most exercise programs, Rippetoe says, is they’re cultlike and single-minded. Sure, the community vibe helps keep you training (and a happy customer), but it’s not going to make you a stronger all-around athlete.

“If I’m a yoga instructor, I’ll tell you the most important thing about fitness is flexibility,” Rippetoe says. “If I’m an aerobics instructor, I’ll say it’s cardio. And if I’m CrossFit, I’ll say it’s everything. My position is strength is the basis for all physical interaction in the environment. If you’re not strong, it doesn’t matter how conditioned your heart and lungs are if you can’t get up off the pot.”

For the rest of the story: http://www.outsideonline.com/fitness/bodywork/the-fit-list/Why-Most-Workout-Programs-are-Scams.html

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