Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Children inundated with 'constant doomsday talk about climate change' warn psychiatrists

climate
Child psychiatrists and other mental health experts say they are seeing an increase in anxiety among today's youth over the constant doom-and-gloom atmosphere they are presented regarding so-called global warming/climate change.

What is most disturbing to them, experts say, is so much talk among the scientific community that nothing more than daily life activities are what is causing the planet to be irreparably damaged. Still, according to Canada's The Globe and Mail newspaper, experts north of the U.S. border say there is hope, despite the volatility and fear being ginned up by many in the scientific community. To stay mentally strong, they say young adults should not just call for change but act to change things:

Dr. Anthony Levitt, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre's director of research in the department of psychiatry, agrees climate-change anxiety increasingly enters into the discussions he has with many of the young people who come to see him. "Younger people [teens to mid-20s] appear to be much more accepting of the science and facts than older people," Levitt observes. He's also seen an uptick in climate-change-related anxiety in parents with younger children.

"For most people who are anxious about climate change, the anxiety is escalated by the fact they do not see an answer or a way to make a change. Worry plus powerlessness leads to distress," says Levitt, who is also a professor in the psychiatry department at the University of Toronto.

The sky really isn't falling

"The answer, on a personal basis, to this kind of helpless distress is 'mastery': that is, helping people to master small tasks that reduce their carbon footprint can lead to a greater sense of control and efficacy for that person -- and with that a reduction in anxiety. Can one person taking action to reduce their carbon footprint change global warming? Who knows. But it can relieve the distress that comes from anxiety mixed with impotence that affects a growing number of people in our society," he said.

Chris Saade, co-director of the Olive Branch Center, a grief and wellness counseling firm in North Carolina, told the paper that he has seen a large jump in the number of patients under the age of 18 who come to him with concerns about the future of the environment.

For the rest of the story: http://www.naturalnews.com/045007_doomsday_talk_climate_change_anxiety.html

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