Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Added Sugar May Boost Risk of Heart Disease, Death

Sugar is piled up into dunes, with more sugar raining down on top.

Many Americans consume too much added sugar, a habit that not only increases the risk of obesity, but may also increase the risk of dying from heart disease, a new study suggests.

Between 2005 and 2010, about 71 percent of Americans consumed 10 percent or more of their daily calories from added sugar, according to the study. The World Health Organization recommends limiting calories from added sugar to less than 10 percent of your daily total.

What's more, people who consumed between 17 and 21 percent of their daily calories from added sugar were nearly 40 percent more likely to die from cardiovascular disease over a 14-year period than those who consumed about 8 percent of their daily calories from added sugar, the study found. [9 Snack Foods: Healthy or Not?

People who drank seven or more sugar-sweetened beverages (such as soda) per week — a common source of added sugar — were about 30 percent more likely to die from cardiovascular disease during the study than those who drank one or fewer sugar-sweetened beverages per week.

"Our findings indicate that most U.S. adults consume more added sugar than is recommended for a healthy diet," the researchers, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, wrote in the Feb. 3 issue of the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. The results "support current recommendations to limit the intake of calories from added sugars in U.S. diets," the researchers said.

For the rest of the story: http://www.livescience.com/43065-added-sugar-heart-disease.html

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